Bolchalk FReY's Blog


Myth #2: It Should Only Take A Couple Of Hours To Design A Logo Or A Website
August 24, 2016, 11:24 am
Filed under: Branding, Design, Uncategorized | Tags: , ,

It’s easy to look at a logo or a brochure layout that appears to be very simple and conclude that did not take much time to design. That conclusion is very far from reality. Graphic designers follow a methodical design process, and every step of that process requires time to complete.

Designers need to research, ask questions, formulate a creative brief that guides them to developing a solid final design. After the brief is established, a bulk of our time goes into creating ideas and concepts. Depending on the number of rounds of revisions, the refinement phase may require additional time. Stronger concepts are refined until the final design is approved. The design process applies to everything from logos to web sites and requires several weeks to several months depending on the scope of the project.

Other aspects of design can be time-intensive. A layout of a document like a brochure, a newsletter or a magazine spread is more than copying and pasting text from a Word document. There needs to be time allowed for typesetting to optimize readability, for formatting to create consistent appearance, and for proofreading so that the message isn’t compromised by errors.

Achieving an effective design solution cannot be rushed. Hastening projects along also leaves room for errors to occur which is a waste of time and money for the client and the designer. Remember, the wise words of Benjamin Franklin, “Take time for all things: great haste makes great waste.”

Advertisements


Is Your Newspaper Advertising Delivering? Here’s Seven Ways to Tell.
August 17, 2016, 2:18 pm
Filed under: Branding, Marketing, Newspapers, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , ,

 

  1. Dominate The Page. A good ad, like people how moved to Arizona, needs its space. In a medium where you, the news and your competitors are all struggling for the same reader, it’s important to “win the spread.”
  2. Corral The Reader. The right border around a small add can give it a big impact. It’s an inexpensive way to fence off your territory and let people know what’s yours.
  3. The Ol’ One-Two. A strong headline and graphic working together can be as appealing as peanut butter and jelly, bacon and eggs, or spaghetti and meatballs. If it’s really spectacular…ice cream and apple pie.
  4. The “Me” Generation. The old Mousketeers asked “Why? Because we like you,” are now asking, “What’s in it for me?” A benefit in the headline will keep them all ears.
  5. Keep It Simple. “See Jack run” and “to be or not to be” are both classics. They are easy to understand. And hard to forget. Whether you’re writing to someone who’s 5 or 50, simple sentences often work best.
  6. White Space. Philip Glass, a famous composer, said it was as much a part if his music as the melody. White space doesn’t have to be filled up with ink. Let it work to your advantage.
  7. Color Gives You Pop! In the black and white world of newspaper, color can really set you apart from the crowd. The pink hair you see people with at the mall will verify that.

 

If your newspaper ads aren’t creating any sales news, shouldn’t we talk?



Is Your Media Plan on Target? Here’s Nine Ways to Tell.
August 4, 2016, 4:14 pm
Filed under: Marketing, Uncategorized | Tags: , , ,
  1. If your ads get all the response of a memo handwritten in a snowbank, we can help. A good media plan should bring traffic, leads and sales.
  2. Media Research. Nostradamus can wing it. But a great media department can’t. You’re entitled to know how many people will get your message and how often. And from a better source than a 500 year old French guy.
  3. Competitor’s Activities. A sharp ad agency will scout out the opposition. If General Custer had kept up with his competitor’s smoke signals, he wouldn’t have ended up wearing an arrow shirt.
  4. Reach and Frequency. Muhammad Ali knew the value of “reach” and “frequency”. So does a good media department. If your advertising hasn’t scored any knockouts lately, maybe you should ring our bell.
  5. Response Analysis. If your agency thinks number crunching is an invite to lunch, call us. Our confidential sourcing methods let you compare as themes, sales promotions, even daily sales. And in the tastiest pie charts ad multicolor graphs your sales manager ever ate up.
  6. Educational Levels. You don’t need to be a Rhodes Scholar to buy a cola. So why include Brain Surgery Digest in your media plan? A good media buy isn’t an over-achiever.
  7. Socio-psychographics. Are you about to import the first car from China made entirely of fortune cookies? Psychographics tell you how to target those innovative folks who aren’t afraid of change. And how not to spend money reaching the terminally conservative.
  8. Right Age. If you’re selling Hilltop Haciendas, but frat boys show up screaming for free beer, then your media strategy’s on rocky ground.
  9. Socio-economics. The “socio” part means reaching the folks most likely to want your product or services. “Economics” is simple: can they pay for it? A smart media buy delivers both.

 

If your media plan is working now you know why. If it isn’t, shouldn’t we talk?