Bolchalk FReY's Blog


Here’s How to Use Outdoor Advertising with a Punch
December 21, 2010, 10:17 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

One of the oldest and misunderstood forms of advertising is outdoor advertising.  Outdoor ads are everywhere in the form of  highway and street billboards,  bus shelters and bus benches transit posters and more.  Strategically placed outdoor advertising guarantees substantial exposure for relatively little investment. This makes outdoor advertising very cost-effective.

Outdoor advertising takes no time off as it works  seven days a week reaching thousands of commuters in their vehicles.

The secret to effective outdoor advertising.
Use these three rules and you’ll win every time: Be Brief – Be Bold – Be Clear. Commuters have only a few seconds to see then read your message. The key is to simplify your  message with clean graphics and readable typestyles.  Be sure to keep your message short with six words or less including your brand name.  Marlboro cigarettes built its brand on outdoor advertising and you can too, by keeping things simple. A very useful resource for design guidelines can be found at Primedia Outdoor.

Please click here to see some samples of our creative work for outdoor advertising.

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Want to make an impression? It only cost 44 cents.
December 15, 2010, 3:49 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

One easy way to distinguish yourself in your business dealings is to take time to write a personal thank you note.  It sounds so simple and seems so obvious, doesn’t it? But with the emergence of email and texting,  penning a personal message has become a lost art in today’s business communications.

Here are some useful tips from Michelle Nichols “In Praise of the ‘Thank You’ Note” to separate you from the rest of the pack.

Now, you’ve just rediscovered a simple, easy, and inexpensive way to be remembered.

By the way, you can subscribe free to Business Week Small Business.

Visit our website for more marketing resources.



Career Questions on the Advertising Business
December 6, 2010, 10:15 pm
Filed under: Education

Kylee Garrett, a student at The University of Arizona, had questions for Michael Bolchalk for her class assignment on advertising

Q. Why did you get into advertising?
A. I started my career with Reader’s Digest in circulation sales and marketing and did field research work for the magazine’s advertisers.

Q. How long have you been in the advertising business?
A. Over 30 years in Tucson

Q. Who has been your favorite client?
A. There are too many to list. Those most favorite clients were the ones who allow us to do good work and treat us with respect.

Q. Who has been your worst client?
A. Clients who were disingenuous. Clients who were not respectful  Clients who would not listen to facts – only their own personal opinions. Clients who did not know what they did not know. Clients who were short sighted.

Q. What was the biggest challenge in creating your own business?
A. I did not start the business. I came to the firm ten years after its formation. I became a partner in the firm in my fifth year. The challenges are many today: a horrible economy; declining or negligible budgets; fewer opportunities to get new business; and migration from traditional advertising to less expensive digital marketing are some of the challenges.

Q. How many people work at Bolchalk Frey Advertising?
A. We currently have nine people on staff.

Q. How long has Bolchalk Advertising been in business?
A. Since 1964.

Q. Who would you say is the most influential person in advertising?
A. It’s hard to say because the history of advertising has had may influential people. The creators of Google and Facebook are changing the advertising game right now. My most influential person is Earl Wettstein, who founded our firm.

Q. What is your favorite part about being in advertising?
A. There are so many positive things about the advertising business. Things like meting new people and creating advertising that works. The longtime relationships and friendships that come from this business are priceless.

Q. Did you major in marketing when you were in college?
A. Yes.